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Facebook is no longer Glassdoor’s ‘Best Place to Work’

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Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer and founder of Facebook Inc. attends the Viva Tech start-up and technology gathering at Parc des Expositions Porte de Versailles on May 24, 2018 in Paris, France. 

Christophe Morin/IP3 | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer and founder of Facebook Inc. attends the Viva Tech start-up and technology gathering at Parc des Expositions Porte de Versailles on May 24, 2018 in Paris, France. 

After a tumultuous year, Facebook has lost its footing as a top-rated employer, based on Glassdoor’s 2019 list of the “Best Places to Work.” After ranking No. 1 last year, Facebook now ranks No. 7, dropping from a 4.6 to 4.5 award score out of a perfect 5. Zoom Video Communications supplanted Facebook as the top seat in the tech category.

The report comes as Facebook continues to be scrutinized by the public for how it handles user data and misinformation on its platform. The Glassdoor ranking adds data to the speculation that Facebook employees, too, are souring on the company. Glassdoor bases its ranking on eight different of factors, including work/life balance, senior management and compensation and benefits, according to Glassdoor’s methodology. On employee satisfaction alone, Facebook has seen a steeper decline, steadily falling from a 4.6 rating in Q1 to a 4.3 in Q4, according to Glassdoor Community Expert Scott Dobroski.

“Facebook employees talked about the ‘move fast’ culture sometimes moving too fast,” said Dobroski in an interview with CNBC, noting that this is the first time Facebook has seen a decline in its award score since 2015. Facebook employees on Glassdoor said they wanted a more robust internal structure and transparency from the company’s leadership, Dobroski added. “Its not a major surprise considering whats been going on with Facebook. Employees want to be kept in the loop.”

Facebook has gone from a hot place to work to a place many employees are itching to leave. Six former Facebook employees told CNBC they have been receiving increasingly more messages from current Facebook employees looking for a way out. They said employees have been motivated to look elsewhere thanks to falling stock prices, continued scandals and the increased bureaucracy that comes with the maturing of any tech company.

Other tech companies have also fallen from top spots on Glassdoor’s list. Google dropped three spots, landing at the eighth-best place to work with an award score of 4.4. Amazon didn’t even make the list, with an award score of 4.1, just outside of the top 100.

Apple, on the other hand, moved up in the ranking, from No. 84 to 71, though it maintained the same score of 4.3. Microsoft moved up in ranking from No. 39 to 34 on the list although their award score dropped from 4.4 to 4.3.

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Goldman says U.S.-China not likely to reach trade deal by March and more tariffs are coming

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President Donald Trump (L) and Chinese President Xi Jinping walk together at the Mar-a-Lago estate in West Palm Beach, Florida, April 7, 2017.

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President Donald Trump (L) and Chinese President Xi Jinping walk together at the Mar-a-Lago estate in West Palm Beach, Florida, April 7, 2017.

Goldman Sachs economists said it’s more likely than not that U.S.-China trade negotiators will not reach a deal in time to head off higher tariffs on March 1, and importers could rush to order their goods in January and February ahead of the deadline.

President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to hold off on further tariffs until March 1 so the two sides could negotiate a trade agreement. China also agreed to remove new auto tariffs on U.S. imports, and Washington reported that Beijing is fulfilling another promise to purchase American soybeans, with its first significant order in six months, amounting to 1.13 million tons.

But they have to show some progress by the March 1 deadline in order to delay further action. “While we think it is a close call, we believe it is slightly more likely that negotiations will fall short of what is necessary for a further delay,” wrote the Goldman economists.

Goldman said international trade data reflect the front-loading of goods ahead of the last round of tariffs, and also the fact that soybean purchases had fallen off dramatically.

The October trade data were the first look at what happened after tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods and on $60 billion of U.S. goods went into effect in September. Goldman said imports and exports were both pulled forward before the $200 billion tariff round went into effect Sept. 24, and they both fell after tariffs were implemented, just as they had done after the first round.

Over the summer months, the U.S. had also implemented 25 percent tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese imports, and China responded in kind.

The effect was a widening in the U.S. trade deficit. “Declining exports along side modestly increasing imports pushed the trade deficit with China to an all-time high in October,” the economists wrote.

U.S. imports from China are about $5 billion lower on an annualized basis and exports are about $15 billion lower, due to seasonal factors surrounding soybean exports to China. The economists said there have been sizable shifts in a few large categories, which includes the impact from soybeans. About 60 percent of annual exports of soybeans to China are in the fourth quarter, about 25 percent in October alone.

“Excluding soybeans, exports to China are only modestly lower on a seasonably adjusted basis,” they wrote. As for imports, U.S. imports of electronic circuits and memory components rose ahead of the second round of tariffs and fell sharply after they were put in place

If there is no agreement by March 1, tariffs are scheduled to rise to 25 percent from 10 percent on $200 billion in Chinese goods.

WATCH:How big Harley-Davidson is and why it’s a trade-war target



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‘We are tired of people asking us about target prices’  

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In November, Lee cut his price target from $25,000 to $15,000. A key driver for the revision was bitcoin’s “break-even” point, the level at which mining costs match the trading price.

Bitcoin is closing out a miserable trading year. The cryptocurrency is down 75 percent since January, trading near $3,324 on Thursday, according to data from CoinDesk. From its high near $20,000 in December, the cryptocurrency has lost more than 82 percent of its value.

For bitcoin to stage a price rebound, Lee said user adoption needs to increase, and it needs to be embraced as a real asset class.

But looking out longer term, if the amount of bitcoin users approached even 7 percent of Visa’s total 4.5 billion currently, Lee’s regression model would place fair value at $150,000 per bitcoin.

“Hence, the risk/reward is still strong,” Lee said. “Given the steep discounts of [bitcoin] to our fair value models, the excessive bearish sentiment about fundamentals does not seem warranted.”

Still, Lee said technicals remain important in cryptocurrency trading and as long as bitcoin remains below its 200-day moving average, investors will likely still stay bearish.



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Slower IT spending could reveal Cisco’s ‘imperfections,’ analyst says

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While stronger technology spending across Wall Street and a spell of innovation at Cisco have boosted the stock to post-recession highs, shares now look a little expensive, according to Normura Instinet.

The brokerage downgraded Cisco’s stock to neutral from buy on Friday, arguing that the strong stream of IT purchases that has buoyed shares may reverse in 2019 to “reveal imperfections in Cisco’s story.”

“Through 2018, IT spending growth accelerated materially, Cisco’s new Catalyst 9000 series more than tripled its customer count, and Cisco’s software mix hit about 25 percent of sales. These drivers helped Cisco exceed consensus estimates through 2018,” analyst Jeffrey Kvaal wrote in a note to clients.

“However, spending may be wobbling; comments from Dell, HPE, and Broadcom suggest incremental caution in chief investment officer thinking,” Kvaal added. “Cisco’s ongoing product refresh leaves it insulated, though not immune, from a slowdown.”

The analyst reiterated his 12-month price target of $50, which implies just 5.3 percent upside over the next year from Thursday’s close of $47.47. That price target yields a multiple of about 15 times Nomura’s calendar year 2019 earnings per share expectation of $3.33.

Shares of Cisco fell more than 2 percent in premarket trading following the downgrade; shares are up 23.9 percent this year.



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